Jun 4, 2017
Stand UP
Posted by Phil Inglis
Series: STAND
It’s never fun to be the one who has to tell the painful truth. We were once leaders at a church where there were 4 soccer teams that played in the local christian churches soccer competition. Now, you might think that a christian competition would be one in which two teams of angelic christian men or women played a gracious and harmonious game of soccer. Nothing could be further from the tru

th. I had plenty of opportunities to talk to referees and almost all of them would say that the christian competition is the most difficult, the roughest, the most passionate and the most violent competition.

One year, some of the relationships on one of the women's teams had gone bad and the coach of the team was struggling to get the girls to work together. The primary offender was a member of the church and was friends with the coach. Something was going on for this girl and she was taking it out on everyone on the field. Unfortunately she couldn’t see how her behaviour affected the team and so it fell to us to have a chat with this player. It was a very difficult conversation to have but because we cared we sat down and talked through the issues and made great progress.

Have you ever been in a similar position? Maybe you've coached a team and had to have a difficult conversation with a struggling player? Maybe you've had a family member who has started making poor choices and feel like you have to say something before they suffer?

Daniel was a servant of one of the most evil kings in history and in Daniel 4 he has the opportunity to stand up and confront the King. How did Daniel do it? Join us as we learn to follow Daniel's example.

 

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  • Jun 4, 2017Stand UP
    Jun 4, 2017
    Stand UP
    Posted by Phil Inglis
    Series: STAND
    It’s never fun to be the one who has to tell the painful truth. We were once leaders at a church where there were 4 soccer teams that played in the local christian churches soccer competition. Now, you might think that a christian competition would be one in which two teams of angelic christian men or women played a gracious and harmonious game of soccer. Nothing could be further from the tru

    th. I had plenty of opportunities to talk to referees and almost all of them would say that the christian competition is the most difficult, the roughest, the most passionate and the most violent competition.

    One year, some of the relationships on one of the women's teams had gone bad and the coach of the team was struggling to get the girls to work together. The primary offender was a member of the church and was friends with the coach. Something was going on for this girl and she was taking it out on everyone on the field. Unfortunately she couldn’t see how her behaviour affected the team and so it fell to us to have a chat with this player. It was a very difficult conversation to have but because we cared we sat down and talked through the issues and made great progress.

    Have you ever been in a similar position? Maybe you've coached a team and had to have a difficult conversation with a struggling player? Maybe you've had a family member who has started making poor choices and feel like you have to say something before they suffer?

    Daniel was a servant of one of the most evil kings in history and in Daniel 4 he has the opportunity to stand up and confront the King. How did Daniel do it? Join us as we learn to follow Daniel's example.

     

  • May 28, 2017Transparent Living
    May 28, 2017
    Transparent Living
    Posted by Sarah Walker
    All Instagram users know how deeply satisfying it is when you get more than 10 likes on a photo and the bar down the bottom changes from people’s names to the little love heart, right? You know you’ve won at life when one of your Facebook posts goes semi-viral and the likes climb into the hundreds. Okay, so maybe that’s a little ridiculous, but so much of our culture today thrives on the images we project on social media. So many things we post and look at on Pinterest, Faceb

    ook and Instagram are a false presentation of perfection. They set an unrealistic standard that can lead to insecurity and frustration when we compare it to our own reality. It’s easy for us to get into the mentality that we have to show people how good we are, or how good our lives are even though that is not always the truth. And even though we do that, and know that everyone else does it as well, we can still find ourselves looking at someone else’s picture perfect life and wishing we had what they had. It’s kind of funny, isn’t it? We know no one’s life is how it’s depicted on social media. Yet we continually compare ourselves with others. We seek gratification and worth and feelings of acceptance through it. But actually, we never get what we’re looking for out of it. The only place we find that full life is in Christ.

    This Sunday Night, we’re going to talk about transparent living; about what it means for us to know the truth about ourselves and about God, and how that should transform how we live. Reflecting back on the experience of Moses, we see that covering who we truly are, or not understanding the truth about who God is can be a destructive way to live. Living transparent helps us to walk in the freedom Christ died to give us.

  • May 21, 2017Stand OUT
    May 21, 2017
    Stand OUT
    Posted by Sarah Walker
    Series: STAND

    If you’re at all interested in American Football, it’s likely that over the last twelve months you’ve heard mention of San Francisco 49ers quarterback, Colin Kaepernick. In a pre-season game last year, Kaepernick refused to stand for the American National Anthem in protest against racial injustice across America. In a NFL Media exclusive, Kaepernick said, “I am not going to stand up to show pride in a flag for a country that oppresses black people and people of colour.” Kaepernick stuck to his word and did not stand for the anthem all season long. Of course, his name frequented the headlines over the season, with a number of professional and college athletes joining him in protest, and a myriad of both support and criticism from the public. The reality is, any time we choose to stand (or sit!) for something, there is a consequence. Kaepernick’s motivation to take a stand for something he believed in may have been good, but the method he chose resulted in offending some people to the point where his message was not heard above the protest itself.

    As Christians, we are called to stand for the things of God; things that are often different to what the world tells us are normal. So whether we like it or not, our decision to stand really matters. Sometimes, like Kaepernick, our decision to remain seated says just as much as our decision to stand. If we can learn to take a stand for the right things, at the right time and in the right way, we can positively impact and change our lives, our churches and our communities. But if we take a stand for the wrong things, at the wrong times, for the wrong reasons, we will fall. This week we begin our new series on the life of Daniel - a Godly man who teaches us the right way to stand for the things that matter most. Join us as we find out what it means to stand out in a world where it’s easier to just blend in.

     

  • May 14, 2017Necessary Sins 4 – Gossip
    May 14, 2017
    Necessary Sins 4 – Gossip

    There is power in sharing secrets with others. When the secret is something positive, like a surprise birthday party for someone, it is great fun for everyone. But when secrets tear people down instead of building them up, the results can be devastating.

    Gossip is a huge problem in the church, but often we don't call gossip by its name. We like to call gossip by euphemisms like "sharing our concerns" or "venting to a brother or sister." We like to think we are in the clear i

    f we know that the information is true and we are simply being "honest" and "telling it like it is". But gossip needn't be false to be evil - there's a lot of truth that shouldn't be passed around. We can tend to think of gossip as one of those “little” sins. But we need to be careful not to write off gossip as a socially acceptable sin. When God talks about gossip, he puts it on the list with things like sexual immorality and murder. Paul in Romans 1 included gossips and slanderers in the same list as those who hate God and murder! Why? Because it is so destructive to relationships. Gossip can tear apart friendships, families, and churches.

    As we wrap up the ‘necessary sins’ series this Sunday, may we be challenged not to see any sin as necessary or acceptable, but to seek to live set apart, praying as David did: “Search me, O God, and know my heart; test me and know my anxious thoughts. Point out anything in me that offends you.”

  • May 7, 2017Necessary Sins 3 – Lust
    May 7, 2017
    Necessary Sins 3 – Lust
    Words have a funny way of changing meaning. It was not so long ago that the word ‘gay’ simply meant happy and joyful. In our age of instant messaging and high-speed communication, more and more definitions of words seem to be changing. For instance, I assume most people would know that if someone is ‘thirsty’ they simply need a drink of water. However, in the era of digital instant messaging the word ‘thirsty’ has taken on a slightly different meaning.

    UrbanDictionary.com is one place on the internet that we can go to understand the changing language of our day. The definition of ‘thirsty’ according to urbandictionary.com is a description of someone who craves the attention of others.

    Our society is in a terrible state: self-esteem is low, connectedness to other people is dropping, social anxiety is growing and depression is at all time high. There are many reasons for this, but the basic truth is that many people, even though they may not realise it, are broken and wounded. Deeply and horrifically wounded. This brokenness and woundedness explains why people are searching for attention, validation, intimacy, assurance and belonging. In an age where video and images of intimate relationships are so readily available, ‘thirsty’ people are drinking them up. Wounded people obsessed with the need for attention and the validation of others often find a fake substitute for this validation and mistake it for reality. Lust is such an epidemic, that we may be tempted to consider it a 'necessary sin' today.

    Jesus understood this idea way back when he met a woman at a well. This woman, who had had five husbands, and was now living with another man, was searching for love, acceptance, validation and self-worth in the arms of men. Jesus recognised that she was ‘thirsty’. She had been hurt, she had been wounded, and Jesus offered her living water, which would heal her in such a way that she would not be ‘thirsty’ again.

    Join us as we encounter Jesus teaching and discuss love, lust, relationships and wholehearted living.

  • Apr 30, 2017Necessary Sins – Anger
    Apr 30, 2017
    Necessary Sins – Anger
    Posted by Rebecca Inglis
     
  • Apr 23, 2017Necessary Sins – Lying
    Apr 23, 2017
    Necessary Sins – Lying
    Posted by Phil Inglis
     
  • Apr 16, 2017WDYSIA – Easter
    Apr 16, 2017
    WDYSIA – Easter
    Posted by Phil Inglis
     
  • Apr 14, 2017WDYSIA – Claudia – The Thief on the Cross
    Apr 14, 2017
    WDYSIA – Claudia – The Thief on the Cross
    Posted by Rebecca Inglis
     
  • Apr 9, 2017WDYSIA – Bartimaeus on Palm Sunday
    Apr 9, 2017
    WDYSIA – Bartimaeus on Palm Sunday
    Posted by Phil Inglis