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Jul 15, 2018
Kids Holiday Program Special “What do you want to be when you grow up?”
Series: Special

“What do you want to be when you grow up?”

When I was 8 years old, I wanted to play basketball for the Opals. When I was 12, I wanted to be a marine biologist. When I was 17, I wanted to be a lawyer. When I was 18 I wanted to be a police officer, and then a teacher, and now, I’m a youth and community worker. The truth is, I’d never really had a clear picture of what I wanted to be when I ‘grew up’, but I did have this strong desire to do whatever God wanted me to do.

Colossians 3:20 says, “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as though you were working for the Lord and not for people.” What I have learnt as I have ‘grown up’, is that who I am is far more important than what I do. The fact that I am a lawyer or a teacher or a police officer matters far less than the person that I am. What matters most is that I am kind, loving, compassionate and Christ-like as I live out what I believe God’s calling me to do, and that I work at it with all my heart.

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  • Jul 15, 2018Kids Holiday Program Special “What do you want to be when you grow up?”
    Jul 15, 2018
    Kids Holiday Program Special “What do you want to be when you grow up?”
    Series: Special

    “What do you want to be when you grow up?”

    When I was 8 years old, I wanted to play basketball for the Opals. When I was 12, I wanted to be a marine biologist. When I was 17, I wanted to be a lawyer. When I was 18 I wanted to be a police officer, and then a teacher, and now, I’m a youth and community worker. The truth is, I’d never really had a clear picture of what I wanted to be when I ‘grew up’, but I did have this strong desire to do whatever God wanted me to do.

    Colossians 3:20 says, “Whatever you do, work at it with all your heart, as though you were working for the Lord and not for people.” What I have learnt as I have ‘grown up’, is that who I am is far more important than what I do. The fact that I am a lawyer or a teacher or a police officer matters far less than the person that I am. What matters most is that I am kind, loving, compassionate and Christ-like as I live out what I believe God’s calling me to do, and that I work at it with all my heart.

  • Jul 8, 2018POP2, Your will be done
    Jul 8, 2018
    POP2, Your will be done
    Posted by Sarah Walker

    For a number of years now the Social Justice Department AUE has been encouraging social media users to use the #KOG or ‘Kingdom of God’ hashtag on images that give us a glimpse of God’s kingdom here on earth. In the midst of our day-to-day lives in a world that is messed up, confusing and sometimes so different to His kingdom, we can see a glimmer of hope. Perhaps it’s something beautiful, somebody being kind to someone else, or maybe it’s one of those moments when we are overwhelmed with thankfulness for a friendship, or for all that God has given us. Those moments, those glimpses of the kingdom of God, are just a taste of what is to come when God makes this world all that it is meant to be.

    Over the past couple of years, this social media campaign has reminded me of two things. Firstly, that God’s kingdom is not some far-off, mystical place that I will one day get to rest in. God’s kingdom is his ideal plan for the world, and it is unfolding all around me. It has also reminded me that I have a role to play, both in identifying where God is already at work in the world, and in bringing his kingdom to earth. For me, this begins by reading, understanding and praying the same words Jesus taught his disciples, “Your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven.” This prayer is more than just well articulated words for Christian’s to recite; it is revolutionary. God’s kingdom, as Jesus describes it, though completely upside down compared to the world we live in, is coming, and we can each play our part in joining with the God who rules it all.

  • Jul 1, 2018Praying with Power- Who, What and Where of Prayer
    Jul 1, 2018
    Praying with Power- Who, What and Where of Prayer
    Posted by Phil Inglis

    Over the last few weeks I have been working in the Salvation Army National Head Office in Melbourne. I have been working with a brilliant team helping the national leaders of the Salvation Army design a brand new way of running the Salvation Army in Australia.

    A common feature of project work is meetings. Lots of meetings with lots of different people to make sure things aren’t duplicated or wasted. Meetings to make sure things aren’t missed or overlooked. At least half of every day is taken up with meetings. Early on in my time there I would often find my mind wondering in those meetings. I would lose focus, I would daydream or start thinking about other things. I didn’t really know who they were talking about, I didn’t know what they were talking about and I didn’t know where it all fit so I found it hard to engage and stay focussed. Over time I got to know people, I began to understand what was at stake and started to see how it all fit together and suddenly I was engaged and interested in every moment of the meeting.

    A similar thing happens sometimes when I try to pray. Sometimes I lose focus my mind wanders and I get distracted. I forget who I’m praying to, where prayer fits in my life and what I’m praying for.

  • Jun 24, 2018Different- Perspective in Persecution
    Jun 24, 2018
    Different- Perspective in Persecution
    Posted by Rebecca Inglis
    Series: Different
    I find so many things in our world surprising. For example, cockroaches can live for weeks without their heads before they die of hunger. People spend more time sitting on the toilet each week than they do exercising. Apparently, we end up spending 1.4 years on the toilet during a lifetime? It’s pretty surprising to me that vending machines kill more people than sharks, and that the total weight of all the ants on earth is comparable to the total weight of all the humans on the planet.

    More seriously, it surprises me that in our world today, even though there is enough food produced worldwide to provide everyone with an adequate diet, nearly 854 million people, or 1 in 7, still go hungry. It is shocking that today 165 million people are suffering from childhood malnutrition. It’s almost unfathomable that more people have access to a mobile phone than a toilet. These facts should surprise and shock us.

    What should not surprise those who are Jesus followers, is that we suffer and are persecuted for our faith. Christians are called to be different, to be holy, to stand out, and so Peter tells early Christians, “Don’t be surprised or shocked that you are going through testing that is like walking through fire.” (1 Peter 4:12) Earlier, Jesus explained to his disciples that they too should expect opposition and persecution from the world. “If the world hates you, keep in mind that they hated me first… if they persecuted me, they will persecute you also.” (John 15:18,20)

  • Jun 17, 2018Different- Calling in a Dark World
    Jun 17, 2018
    Different- Calling in a Dark World
    Posted by Sarah Walker
    Series: Different
    “God’s calling me to be a missionary.” “I’m called to be a teacher.” “I’m called to be an officer.” “God is calling me to _______” When I was a kid, I was fairly convinced that I needed to ‘discover God’s call on my life’. To be honest, I’m not even really sure what that means. Somehow, I’d misunderstood the concept of calling, and believed it to mean something incredibly narrow. I was anticipating an audible voice of God that would reveal to me my life’s purpose. If I didn’t hear it, well, perhaps I wasn’t one of those ‘called’ people and I could just choose for myself the direction my life should go.

    Reading through the book of 1 Peter, we see that he uses the words call, calling, or called, over and over again. When Peter uses these words, they are not in reference to an occupation or career, but a different way of life. A call to a different standard of living, every single day. A call to live holy, from our God who is holy.

    As it turns out, I do believe I’m called to be an officer, but that calling is temporary in the scheme of eternity. What matters more is how I live out everyday. ‘An exemplary life’, as Peter puts it, is what I am called to live as a follower of Christ. Do you want confirmation on what you believe to be God’s call on your life? Then start living out his call to a relationship with him, to a better way of living, to a life of holiness. The reality is, if we don’t understand our daily call to a different standard, we will never grasp our temporary call to an assignment.

  • Jun 10, 2018Different- Values in an Unholy Culture
    Jun 10, 2018
    Different- Values in an Unholy Culture
    Posted by Rebecca Inglis
    Series: Different

    When my three children were young, we travelled as a family for a month throughout Southeast Asia. Everywhere we went, people would stare at Bradley, Chloe and Emily, and some would even try to touch them. People were fascinated by them and they became the centre of attention so often because they were so different; they stood out. People would “Ooo” and “Ahhh” at them, in awe of their baby blonde hair and gorgeous blue eyes, which screamed that they were foreigners. It was obvious they were not Asian, they did not belong there and they certainly did not fit in.

    When the Apostle Peter was writing to a group of people that were severely persecuted in the First Century, he told them to live out their time on earth as ‘foreigners’ in reverent fear (1 Peter 1:17). Other translations say ‘temporary residents’ or ‘strangers.’ Peter, inspiring hope, reminds his readers again and again that this world was not their home; they were just passing through, they were sojourners.

    This world is not our home either. Peter reminds us that as citizens of the Kingdom of Heaven we are foreigners here on earth and therefore we will stand out. If you're a follower of Jesus, you're called to be different. You'll have different values, different passions, different uses of your time and different uses of your resources. You'll be different as a parent, you'll be different as a spouse, you'll be different in the way that you work. The result of a different life driven by faith should be that people are fascinated by you.

  • Jun 3, 2018Different- Faith in Trials
    Jun 3, 2018
    Different- Faith in Trials
    Posted by Phil Inglis
    Series: Different

    It may not always be obvious, but Christians are called to be different. Not just any kind of different, a special kind of different that the bible calls ‘HOLY.’ It's the same kind of different that God is. It’s not always easy trying to be holy. Trying to be different like God is difficult, because life itself is often not predictable.

    Almost from the moment you take your first breath life is challenging: going to school, navigating relationships, building a career, growing a family. All of these things add challenges and complications to life. Then add life’s more unpredictable events: being laid-off at work, having a car breakdown, being evicted from your home, flood, bushfire, divorce, the death of family members and friends. It doesn’t take long to figure out that life comes with some very traumatic challenges and trials. But if we read the scriptures and listen to the teachings of Jesus, we know that we are called to be holy in the face of these trials. We are called to be different, just like God is different, when we are confronted with trauma and pain.

    This week Phil is going to launch a brand new message series, walking through the New Testament book of 1 Peter. We will consider and try to better understand that when trials come, we are called to stand strong in our faith and be different.

  • May 20, 2018Pentecost – The Power of The Holy Spirit
    May 20, 2018
    Pentecost – The Power of The Holy Spirit
    Posted by Phil Inglis
    Series: Pentecost
    When we are young we often develop quite separate worlds, for instance one when we are at school and another when we are at home. On occasions those worlds meet; parent teacher nights, birthday parties or perhaps a parent volunteering in the school canteen. When I went to high school, this meeting of worlds went to a whole new level. My father was a teacher at my high school, he was always there. My friends all wondered what it was like and actually thought it must have been terrible and hard and awkward all the time. It wasn’t. It was actually pretty great.
    In the Bible we see something similar. For millennia humans had considered God to be resident in some temple or other place of worship. There were specific places and times when people would go to meet with God. There appeared to be one world for God and one for humanity, with only occasional times and places when the two would overlap. When Jesus ascended to heaven, everything changed. In Acts 2 we read the incredible story of God coming to live in ALL people as the Holy Spirit. Not just occasionally, not in specific places, not just in the person of Jesus, but in all people, all the time. Some people might think that makes life terrible, hard and awkward all the time. It wasn’t. It is actually pretty great.
    Tune in as we talk about what the Holy Spirit brings to the lives of all believers.
  • May 13, 2018Foundations Week 11 – What about the church?
    May 13, 2018
    Foundations Week 11 – What about the church?
    Posted by Sarah Walker
    Series: Foundations
    A young man was struggling in his faith and found himself drifting in his doubts. Seeking advice, he went to see a wise older man who lived in a cottage with a coal fire. The two men discussed the young man’s troubles, and as they did the older man got up and walked over to the fire. With his tongs, he reached in and took a red-hot coal out of the fire and placed it on the hearth. He watched the coal transform from red-hot to black and cool. When the young man finished speaking, the wise old man picked up his tongs once again and put the coal back into the fire. Within a few minutes the coal was red-hot again. He didn’t need to say a thing. The young man left knowing exactly why his faith had gone dull.
     
    There seems to be a trend in western society of people who are saying goodbye to the local church. We’ve heard statistics of those who leave because they no longer believe or they are no longer engaged. But, surprisingly, others leave because they say they want more of God in their lives and the church just isn’t doing it for them. Often, their disenchantment with the Church is legitimate. But we have to ask, would Jesus, the Head of the Church, favour a churchless Christianity? Many who are disillusioned with the Church today romanticise the early church, not realising how broken things were then as well. Take Corinth, for example. As the most prominently represented New Testament church, Corinth was a dysfunctional mess. But Paul never gave up on Corinth. Instead of walking away, he pressed in. He knew why the church existed, and he believed in what it could be.
     
    There is no such thing as a perfect local church. But the impact of being part of a local church is transformative. It’s where we live in community with other believers; where we belong; where we work together. The church is where we grow, recharge and reignite our faith. It’s where we be Jesus, together. In this message we wrap up our ‘Foundations’ series by answering the question, “What about the church?” Tune in as we we’re reminded of why the church really matters.
  • May 6, 2018Foundations Week 10 – Does God Heal Today?
    May 6, 2018
    Foundations Week 10 – Does God Heal Today?
    Posted by Phil Inglis
    Series: Foundations
    Dr Richard Casdorph is an experienced doctor and medical researcher. He has published more than eighty research papers in his career that has spanned almost six decades, and has earned the respect of his fellow doctors. In the 1970’s he undertook a research project with a difference, interviewing ten people who claimed to have been miraculously healed of serious conditions. He examined all the case histories – X-rays, medical reports, treatment plans, etc – and also submitted them to medical specialists for review. In all ten cases, the evidence showed that an unusual healing had taken place after the patient received prayer for healing. Dr Casdorph reflected, “There is no natural or medical explanation that I can give. I can only categorise these healings as miraculous.”
    There is documented medical evidence of unusual medical recoveries after prayer for healing. However, most of us have known and loved someone who despite prayers for healing, has not been healed. Someone who suffered with illness for decades, or who died much earlier than we believe they should have. So which is it? Does God heal today, as He did through Jesus, when He walked on this earth? Some people are skeptical, some would like to believe it but are not really sure.
    Tune in as we continue our ‘Foundations’ series and attempt to answer the question, ‘Does God heal today?' And the brief answer is yes! Join us as we consider healing in the Bible, in the early Church and why and how we should pray for healing today.